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    Books

    4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

    4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

    Book of the Month for February 2017

    Literature

    Writers in Motion

    Writers in Motion

    When Charles Dickens invited guests over for dinner, it was his tendency to take them on a little pre-dinner stroll. Some four hours later, the famished group returned back to his home for their later-than-planned meal. The ‘Sketches by Boz’ author was used to walking hours at a time. He sketched life by traversing it, gathering up material through close inspection of daily encounters.

    Reading Quirks

    Reading Quirks (21-24)

    Reading Quirks (21-24)

    This is a comic series about all those weird things we readers do.
    Script by The Wild Detectives
    Illustrations by (the uber-talented) Laura Pacheco
    February ’17

    Literature

    Dallas, A Literary Awakening

    Dallas, A Literary Awakening

    I grew up in Dallas, and the joke my father always used to tell about the city was this: What’s the difference between yogurt and Dallas? Yogurt is the one with the live culture. He had lived in New York for a time after the war, hand picked by composer Richard Rodgers to sing in his Broadway musical South Pacific, so he knew a thing or two about a more expansively cultured life.

    Records

    Brian Eno – Reflection

    Brian Eno – Reflection

    America is in the mouth of madness my friends. No sooner than pundits, experts, philosophers utter “this cannot get any worse,” President Trump keeps demonstrating it can. The album of the month belongs Brian Eno. ‘Reflection’ is an introspective ambient wordless mediation that provides space to catch your breath. Embrace the now. One day at a time. Sometimes that is all we can hope for.

    Books

    Nothing Ever Dies

    Nothing Ever Dies

    Viet Thanh Nguyen sees the American Dream as an insidious, supremely effective tool of colonization. The point seems inarguable; it feels unutterably sad.

    314 W Eighth St. Oak Cliff.
    Dallas, TX 75208. T: 214-942-0108