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    Tinajero Papers

    Static Age – Chapter 1: Intercession

    Static Age – Chapter 1: Intercession

    Mid 90’s, grunge, Deep Ellum. It’s been almost two years since the punk-obsessed teen Nathan developed his unlikely crush on Vanessa, the daughter of a local Baptist preacher. Now, in the midst of producing his first low budget zombie film, his young love has just returned from a mysterious freshman year of college giving him a chance to revive their relationship. But Nate has only a few days to rush in before she leaves yet again, for a summer-long backpacking adventure through Europe. Can he reconcile the conservative values of her father—who became something of a father to him as well—with the exciting attitudes of his stage-diving, cop-trouncing companions? And who can possibly resist the charms of their neon-haired, pill-popping friend Roxy, as cutely endearing as she is dangerous? Read the rest at Jukepop and help me win the contest and get this work published by remembering to vote for each chapter!

    Own Horn

    Why did we add a bar to our bookstore? – A TEDx Talk at UTA

    Why did we add a bar to our bookstore? – A TEDx Talk at UTA

    Last April, UTA invited us to give a talk as part of their TEDx 2016 program. It was a great opportunity and a considerable challenge -we don’t usually talk to large crowds outside bars. After overcoming our stage fright, we managed to put this talk together and present the ideas behind this dream-project of ours: The Wild Detectives. Pardon our accent and hope you like it!

    Literature

    Ménage à Trois: Maupassant, Flaubert, and Desire

    Ménage à Trois: Maupassant, Flaubert, and Desire

    “How strange and unpredictable life is! How little there is between happiness and misery,” remarks Madame Loisel, the tragic heroine of Guy de Maupassant’s masterful short story “The Necklace.” In this—perhaps trite—line by Maupassant, the rich legacy left by French writers is subtlety revealed. If the British gave us valuable moral lessons, and the Russians instructed us to deconstruct the human soul, what did the French teach us? Simple: to live. Ardently, eloquently, poetically. Never passively. The French taught us to live, perhaps en rose, perhaps en blanc et bleue, but live colorfully nonetheless. In honor of Bastille Day, here are my favorite French stories about living with desire.

    Records

    Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool

    Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool

    After an uncharacteristic misstep in their discography, Radiohead return with an elegant vengeance: A Moon Shaped Pool. Their new album is dark, haunting rock mixed with electronic beats, in other words: classic Radiohead. It is nothing short of thrilling to see masters of their craft producing art. Thom Yorke remains one of Rock’s greatest enigmas. Here is another piece of the puzzle for lifelong fans.

    Literature

    How My Students Taught Me to Love To Kill a Mockingbird (Again)

    How My Students Taught Me to Love To Kill a Mockingbird (Again)

    Is there an American novel that invites more haters than To Kill a Mockingbird? Admit it: you judge someone who names it as his or her favorite novel of all time. If something is wildly beloved by the masses, it must be middle-brow, sentimental crap at best, right? That was my official position on Harper Lee’s classic bestseller for many years—until recently, when a spunky group of students reminded me of its greatness.

    Literature

    #howtowinanelection

    #howtowinanelection

    As a follow-up to my piece on an orange-zest-faced demagogue of our time, I share some timely examples from Robert Penn Warren’s 1947 political classic All the King’s Men. In light of this most recent election and its theatrics, it seems the old adage “The pen is mightier than the sword” can be amended to “The rabble-rouse is mightier than the reasoned.”

    Literature

    The Books We Don’t Read

    The Books We Don’t Read

    Many of us define ourselves by our jobs and interests, our friends and family, and our tastes in music, movies, or books. What we don’t think about is what lies just outside our own world, or perhaps just as importantly, what lies within our world that we haven’t noticed. Returning to old ideas, either through rereading or reading translated books, helps us define our past and present selves.

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